Helping You Receive The SSDI Benefits You Need And Deserve

Understanding the reason for reviewing a disability

On Behalf of | Jun 17, 2020 | Social Security Disability Benefits for Injuries |

Recipients of Social Security Disability benefits in New Jersey may eventually get to a point where they are able to fully resume working and may no longer need financial assistance. However, this process is often a gradual one and requires people to regularly communicate with the Social Security Administration to update officials on their condition.

Before administrators are able to make a decision or modify a person’s benefits, they first conduct a review of that person’s disability.

Establishing the need for a review

According to the Social Security Administration, they may review a person’s case if their eligibility for Medicaid opens back up because they have returned to work or if their work status changed. Any notable changes in a person’s medical condition that allows them to resume additional responsibilities at work may also require a review. During a review of disability, administrators will assess whether or not people have improved enough that their work is equivalent to substantial gainful activity.

If there is a chance that a person’s condition has improved to the point where they are no longer eligible for Social Security Disability benefits, they may need to repay any funds they received while they were awaiting a decision from the SSA. Because of this, some people choose to suspend their benefits until they know the outcome of their disability review.

The process of a review

When conducting a disability review, the Social Security Administration requires people to provide a detailed list of information including the names of their doctors and the names of the facilities where they received treatment. This information may help to provide a breakdown of visits to their health care provider, an analysis of treatments they have received, a list of medications they are taking and other valuable information that may contribute to the SSA’s decision about the continuation of benefits. People will also need to provide any information about the work they are able to do even if it requires modifications or temporary reassignment.

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