Helping You Receive The SSDI Benefits You Need And Deserve

Those denied SSD benefits waiting up to 2 years for hearing

On Behalf of | Sep 29, 2017 | Social Security Disability |

Living with a disability can be challenging. While individuals with disabilities are able to go through life just like anyone else, those suffering from severe disabilities can find it difficult to work a job or even care for him or herself. Thus, social security disability benefits can be extremely beneficial in these matters. The SSA has provided a program that essentially provides financial assistance to those unable to meet his or her basic needs because of a disability preventing them from making a livable income.

According to recent reports, there are currently more than 1 million U.S. resident waiting for a disability hearing that will determine if they qualify for disability benefits. With the average wait of nearly two years, some applicants will have to wait longer than they are expected to live with their disabling condition.

All of these applicants currently waiting have been denied at least once. Although most applications are initially denied, it is believed that the SSD system is one where the outcome of a case is highly dependent on the person that decides it. However, current data suggests that most applicants that complete the appeals process will eventually obtain a favorable decision and receive benefits.

Current data reveals that the average benefit payment is around $1,037 a month. This is far too small of a payment to get a family of two out of poverty, but it is still a necessary financial benefit that could make a huge difference if they are timely approved. Sadly, some benefits come too late. Some conditions could be so serious, giving some applicants a deadline on their life. Thus, if benefits are not approved in that timeframe, he or she may not be alive to enjoy the benefits they were approved for.

Obtaining Social Security disability benefits can be vital for some. Thus, it is important to understand the current situation with this program and ways an applicant can better her position in the application or appeals process.

 

Archives