Do you have a valid disability claim because you have arthritis?

| Dec 13, 2018 | Firm News |

New Jersey readers know there are specific types of medical conditions that could prevent them from working. When a person’s physical injury, mental illness or medical condition keeps him or her from earning a living, it could be grounds for a disability claim. This is the case for many people living with serious cases of arthritis.

Arthritis is a painful condition that can limit mobility and cause a person a significant amount of pain. You know there are many who are able to live and work as normal with this type of illness, but that may not be the case for you. Depending on the type of arthritis you have, it may be physically impossible for you work and support yourself.

Types of arthritis and their impact on victims

The way that arthritis affects you may be different from the way it impacts someone else, but common side effects include pain, loss of range of motion and stiffness in the joints. There are a few different types of this disease, and they can all change your life in different ways. The main types include:

  • Degenerative – This type of arthritis develops when the cartilage between joints dissolves, leaving a person in serious pain. Pain can become quite severe and limiting, and victims may experience loss of strength in the joints.
  • Metabolic – This type of arthritis comes from a build-up in certain types of acid. Over time, the build-up crystallizes in the joints, leading to severe pain.
  • Inflammatory – This type of arthritis occurs when the immune system causes inflammation in the joints, causing serious pain. This inflammation can also cause damage to other systems.
  • Infectious – This type of arthritis happens when bacteria or a virus enters the human body, triggering an inflammatory response and pain in the joints. Over time, this type of arthritis can eventually become chronic.

People with chronic cases of arthritis may find it difficult to work, stand, sit or perform job-related tasks due to pain or decreased physical capabilities. If this is happening to you, it could be in your interests to initiate the process of filing a disability claim with the Social Security Administration.

The SSA considers arthritis to be a valid disabling condition for some applicants, but even with severe cases, it is not always easy to get benefits. It may be prudent to work with a legal ally experienced in Social Security disability claims to help you complete the initial paperwork, gather medical documentation and address any challenges that may arise.